Bunny Blog

Easter Rabbits: A 10+ Year Commitment

Baby bunniesIt may be tempting when you see that adorable baby bunny for sale at the pet shop or on Craigslist. But before you buy a rabbit for Easter, consider these facts.

Rabbits are not low-maintenance pets

Although rabbits can be wonderful house pets, they aren’t for everyone. Not only do they live 10 years or longer, they have very specific requirements for care. This includes providing unlimited hay and fresh greens, bunny-proofing your house, and providing exercise space, social interaction and enrichment. Read more >

Rabbits are not good pets for young children

When you bring a pet rabbit into your home, keep in mind the primary caregiver should always be an adult. An adult must ensure the well-being and safety of the pet. Although rabbits appear cuddly, they generally do not like being picked up, held or chased. This is usually disappointing news to children. Read more >

Rabbits can be expensive pets

Perhaps you can get a great deal buying a rabbit from a breeder or pet shop (or maybe you can even get one for free), but throughout their lifetime, rabbits can certainly rack up the bills. Expenses include veterinary bills (from a rabbit-savvy, exotics vet), food and other supplies, and bunny-proofing/household repair costs. Read more >

There are many wonderful alternatives to buying a live rabbit for Easter, including plush bunnies, chocolate bunnies, bunny Peeps, and picture books about bunnies. The folks over at Make Mine Chocolate share alternative offerings and events that benefit rabbit rescue groups (who are flooded with unwanted bunnies just days after Easter every year).

If you’ve already bought a rabbit for Easter, read through our resources on properly caring for your the newest member of your family. Here are a few resources to get you started:

Like this blog post? Please share it!

2 thoughts on “Easter Rabbits: A 10+ Year Commitment

  1. James Harding

    Well said. Rabbits are a long commitment and they need a lot of attention. Their teeth never stop growing and should be checked regularly. Pet shops really need to do more to make people aware of how to correctly look after rabbits and they should not really be on their own either.

    Reply
  2. brooke

    Would the society consider making a pdf that could be printed to put in the yards of rabbit fans this time of year?

    A neighbor has a sign with an image of a rabbi and the statement, “a 10 year commitment.” I would love to put one up in my yard during April.

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *