Bunny Blog

Adventures in Bunny Proofing: Baseboard Protection

In preparation for a newcomer into our household (a baby in September!), we decided to do some rearranging of rooms. Coco and Cosette, who used to live upstairs, were moved downstairs, along with my office.  So now they primarily live in the kitchen / hallway, with supervised access to my office.

Rabbit under table

Coco in his new favorite spot under the kitchen table.

The house is an old Victorian with beautiful, intricate woodwork in the downstairs. It provides a multitude of wooden corners and edges that would be a rabbit’s dream to destroy.

Woodwork

Examples of the Victorian woodwork.

As we discussed in our Bunny Proofing article, baseboards will get destroyed if not protected. When Coco and Cosette lived upstairs, we mainly blocked off the baseboards with furniture and tunnels, and we also just let them go a bit. Periodically, we would sand them down and repaint them, as the upstairs baseboards were just 2x4s, not like the historic, intricate moldings found downstairs.

But when keeping the baseboards in tact really does matter, Mary Cotter of the House Rabbit Society and Amy Sedaris suggest tacking or nailing furring strips or 2x4s to the baseboards so the rabbits just chew those instead.  You can paint these to match your baseboards so they blend in a bit better.  (See our Bunny Proofing article for a video of Mary Cotter and Amy Sedaris.)

We liked this idea, but we were also looking for a solution that you could easily remove on a temporary basis (perhaps when having dinner guests, e.g.) and one that did not involve putting a lot of holes in the moldings.

We brainstormed a few different ideas, including using zip-tied storage cube panels that would run along the walls and would be attached by a limited number of hooks by the doorways. Furring strips zip-tied to the storage cube panels would provide a buffer between the fencing and moldings so that little rabbit mouths couldn’t reach the woodwork. This solution would allow us to remove the fencing (which would be unsightly) in a quick and easy way, and then put them back on as necessary.

But in the end, we decided on this solution:

Baseboard protectors

We used custom-sized wood panels (connected with hinges to accommodate all the different angles) attached to the moldings via Velcro strips.  The panels were stained to blend in better with the rest of the woodwork.  Because they’re held onto the baseboards with Velcro, they’re easily removable by us (but not the rabbits).

It’s been two days and Coco and Cosette have already gone to work chewing the wood panels. No surprise there. But the baseboards themselves are protected from further damage.

What solutions have you tried to protect your baseboards?

Amy Sedaris and Bunnies in Style Magazine

Amy Sedaris

Amy Sedaris with her rabbit Dusty.

Comedian, actress, and house rabbit advocate Amy Sedaris recently gave an interview in Style Magazine. She spoke about her rabbit Dusty, who recently passed away at 12 years old, Tattletale, her first rabbit, as well as general tidbits about living with house rabbits. Here are some highlights.

Regarding her friend, Stephen Colbert:

“Stephen wasn’t crazy about getting a rabbit. His kids wanted one and he didn’t want the responsibility, but he got a little black bunny, who actually just had its leg amputated. And I went over to his house and was like, ‘Stephen! You’re doing everything wrong!’ and I sent him hay and books and information. Now the rabbit is doing really well!”

On pampering her bunnies:

“One time on Strangers, we did an Indians episode. I brought the tepee back to my apartment, and Tattletale lived in that for a while.”

On rabbit behavior:

“Give them any kind of cardboard to chew on. They love it. They chew everything. My rabbits chewed my shoes and the side of my bed. They shredded my bed skirts. All of my clothes still have holes. If you really love your rabbit, you won’t care.”

Read the full article at Style.com.

Rabbit Welfare Spotlight: DisabledRabbits.com

For the owners of rabbits with special needs, there’s a new resource to help guide them. DisabledRabbits.com is a not-for-profit educational website dedicated to giving owners of disabled rabbits the resources, tools and guidance they need to provide their special needs buns with the best care possible.

DisabledRabbits.com

DisabledRabbits.com provides care tips for paralyzed rabbits, rabbits with head tilt, rabbits with splay leg, rabbits with arthritis, blind rabbits, deaf rabbits, elderly rabbits and rabbits suffering from other conditions that affect their physical health and mobility. Learn about pain management techniques, special housing setups, wheelchairs, hygiene, and more!

Visit DisabledRabbits.com >

Welcome to Our Revamped Website!

My House Rabbit Website ScreenshotAfter a bit of tinkering, we’ve redeveloped the website to include some new features:

  • Search Bar
    Many people had asked us to provide a search bar on the site. Now you can search for articles and blog posts using the search bar at the top of any page.
  • Photo Gallery
    Our new photo gallery allows us to add photos more efficiently. This means more frequent updates of the cute bunny photos that you submit. (If you’d like to submit photos, email photos@myhouserabbit.com. Include your bunny’s name.)
  • Optimized for Smart Phones and Tablets
    The new site has a responsive design. This means the layout adapts to smaller screen sizes such as smart phones and tablets.  When you’re browsing on these devices, the text will be large enough to be readable, and you also won’t have to do any side-scrolling.
  • Slicker Comments Section
    We cleaned up the styles on the comments section on the bunny blog. Now not only can you comment on the post, you can also reply directly to other comments. We also put in a new default bunny avatar in case you don’t have your own.
    (Speaking of the blog, we put all of our Bunny Blogroll links on the Links page. That way all the links are accessible from one spot.)
  • New Articles
    We’ve added a few new articles to the site about misbehaving bunnies and about getting ready for a new house rabbit. Check out:
    Rabbit Peeing on the Couch? What to Do
    Help! My Rabbit Hates Me!
    Preparing for Your First House Rabbit
    How Much Does a Pet Rabbit Cost?
    How to Care for a Pet Rabbit

We hope you like the new improvements. Tell us in the comments what you think!

Palomino Rabbits at B.U.N.S. in Santa Barbara, CA

Right before Christmas this past year, Buns Urgently Needing Shelter (B.U.N.S.) in Santa Barbara, CA received a delivery of 22 Palomino rabbits. Now, months later, the shelter still needs your help! (A delivery of 22 bunnies is a lot to take on all at once!)

Palomino rabbits at B.U.N.S.

Feeding time for the Christmas bunnies.

You can help the shelter by:

More about B.U.N.S.

B.U.N.S. is an independent non-profit corporation dedicated to the care and welfare of rabbits and guinea pigs. B.U.N.S. works to find bunnies and guinea pigs permanent homes, and educates the public on caring for their guinea pig and rabbit companion. Visit their website >