Bunny Blog

Rabbit Welfare Spotlight: DisabledRabbits.com

For the owners of rabbits with special needs, there’s a new resource to help guide them. DisabledRabbits.com is a not-for-profit educational website dedicated to giving owners of disabled rabbits the resources, tools and guidance they need to provide their special needs buns with the best care possible.

DisabledRabbits.com

DisabledRabbits.com provides care tips for paralyzed rabbits, rabbits with head tilt, rabbits with splay leg, rabbits with arthritis, blind rabbits, deaf rabbits, elderly rabbits and rabbits suffering from other conditions that affect their physical health and mobility. Learn about pain management techniques, special housing setups, wheelchairs, hygiene, and more!

Visit DisabledRabbits.com >

Welcome to Our Revamped Website!

My House Rabbit Website ScreenshotAfter a bit of tinkering, we’ve redeveloped the website to include some new features:

  • Search Bar
    Many people had asked us to provide a search bar on the site. Now you can search for articles and blog posts using the search bar at the top of any page.
  • Photo Gallery
    Our new photo gallery allows us to add photos more efficiently. This means more frequent updates of the cute bunny photos that you submit. (If you’d like to submit photos, email photos@myhouserabbit.com. Include your bunny’s name.)
  • Optimized for Smart Phones and Tablets
    The new site has a responsive design. This means the layout adapts to smaller screen sizes such as smart phones and tablets.  When you’re browsing on these devices, the text will be large enough to be readable, and you also won’t have to do any side-scrolling.
  • Slicker Comments Section
    We cleaned up the styles on the comments section on the bunny blog. Now not only can you comment on the post, you can also reply directly to other comments. We also put in a new default bunny avatar in case you don’t have your own.
    (Speaking of the blog, we put all of our Bunny Blogroll links on the Links page. That way all the links are accessible from one spot.)
  • New Articles
    We’ve added a few new articles to the site about misbehaving bunnies and about getting ready for a new house rabbit. Check out:
    Rabbit Peeing on the Couch? What to Do
    Help! My Rabbit Hates Me!
    Preparing for Your First House Rabbit
    How Much Does a Pet Rabbit Cost?
    How to Care for a Pet Rabbit

We hope you like the new improvements. Tell us in the comments what you think!

Palomino Rabbits at B.U.N.S. in Santa Barbara, CA

Right before Christmas this past year, Buns Urgently Needing Shelter (B.U.N.S.) in Santa Barbara, CA received a delivery of 22 Palomino rabbits. Now, months later, the shelter still needs your help! (A delivery of 22 bunnies is a lot to take on all at once!)

Palomino rabbits at B.U.N.S.

Feeding time for the Christmas bunnies.

You can help the shelter by:

More about B.U.N.S.

B.U.N.S. is an independent non-profit corporation dedicated to the care and welfare of rabbits and guinea pigs. B.U.N.S. works to find bunnies and guinea pigs permanent homes, and educates the public on caring for their guinea pig and rabbit companion. Visit their website >

Say No to Live Bunnies for Easter!

paperAs Easter draws near, it is important to spread the word that live rabbits should not be given as Easter gifts.  While rabbits make excellent companions for some families, they have a unique set of needs that not everyone can meet.

Here are a few:

You will need to bunny-proof your home or else your rabbit will wreak havok.
Rabbits need plenty of space to exercise. They are social, curious, and intelligent animals. But they also have an incessant urge to chew.  Everything from wooden chair legs to electrical wires to remote control buttons to mouldings are fair game to rabbits.  Rabbit owners will need to take the time to properly protect and stow away personal belongings.

Rabbits need access to fresh hay at all times.
If you have grass allergies, a rabbit probably isn’t for you.  Hay provides the primary sustenance for a rabbits to maintain digestive and dental health. You can’t just give them pellets.

Rabbits generally don’t like being held.
Although rabbits can be affectionate, they’re not as “huggable” as people imagine. Children and adults alike may be disappointed when Bunnikins won’t sit contentedly in their arms or laps. Most rabbits prefer to stay on the floor and have you sit on the floor with them (quietly).

For more information, read our article, Easter and Rabbits.

House Rabbit Society Offers Aid to Rabbits Found in Landfill

Rescued rabbitsThe latest Emergency Rescue Grant from the House Rabbit Society was awarded to Napa Humane Society and the student chapter of the UC Davis Humane Society Veterinary Medical Association to help pay for spays and neuters of 27 rabbits rescued from a field near the Fairfield landfill in Solano County, California.

If you would like to help rescue efforts like these, you can donate to the House Rabbit Society towards their Emergency Rescue Grant program. Learn more >

Pet Rabbit Ownership Survey

survey

If you currently or have had a rabbit and are over 18 years old, you can fill out a survey called, “Exploring the experience of owning a pet rabbit.”  The purpose of the survey is to gather information about rabbit ownership, rabbit-human relationships, and the challenges of ownership.  The results will help develop educational materials for new rabbit owners and influence future research projects.

The study is being conducted by Dr. Jason Coe, DVM, PhD and Ms. Tasha Welch from the Department of Population Medicine at the University of Guelph.

Take the survey at www.petrabbitsurvey.com.