Bunny Blog

Say No to Live Bunnies for Easter!

paperAs Easter draws near, it is important to spread the word that live rabbits should not be given as Easter gifts.  While rabbits make excellent companions for some families, they have a unique set of needs that not everyone can meet.

Here are a few:

You will need to bunny-proof your home or else your rabbit will wreak havok.
Rabbits need plenty of space to exercise. They are social, curious, and intelligent animals. But they also have an incessant urge to chew.  Everything from wooden chair legs to electrical wires to remote control buttons to mouldings are fair game to rabbits.  Rabbit owners will need to take the time to properly protect and stow away personal belongings.

Rabbits need access to fresh hay at all times.
If you have grass allergies, a rabbit probably isn’t for you.  Hay provides the primary sustenance for a rabbits to maintain digestive and dental health. You can’t just give them pellets.

Rabbits generally don’t like being held.
Although rabbits can be affectionate, they’re not as “huggable” as people imagine. Children and adults alike may be disappointed when Bunnikins won’t sit contentedly in their arms or laps. Most rabbits prefer to stay on the floor and have you sit on the floor with them (quietly).

For more information, read our article, Easter and Rabbits.

House Rabbit Society Offers Aid to Rabbits Found in Landfill

Rescued rabbitsThe latest Emergency Rescue Grant from the House Rabbit Society was awarded to Napa Humane Society and the student chapter of the UC Davis Humane Society Veterinary Medical Association to help pay for spays and neuters of 27 rabbits rescued from a field near the Fairfield landfill in Solano County, California.

If you would like to help rescue efforts like these, you can donate to the House Rabbit Society towards their Emergency Rescue Grant program. Learn more >

Pet Rabbit Ownership Survey

survey

If you currently or have had a rabbit and are over 18 years old, you can fill out a survey called, “Exploring the experience of owning a pet rabbit.”  The purpose of the survey is to gather information about rabbit ownership, rabbit-human relationships, and the challenges of ownership.  The results will help develop educational materials for new rabbit owners and influence future research projects.

The study is being conducted by Dr. Jason Coe, DVM, PhD and Ms. Tasha Welch from the Department of Population Medicine at the University of Guelph.

Take the survey at www.petrabbitsurvey.com.

 

Rabbits Unearth Rare Artifacts

One bunny archaeologist at Land's End. Photo by: David Chapman Photography for Land's End Landmark.

One bunny archaeologist at Land’s End. Photo by: David Chapman Photography for Land’s End Landmark.

While constructing their intricate warrens, wild rabbits living on Land’s End, the westernmost point in England, recently unearthed some rare ancient treasures.

Big Heritage, a nonprofit archaeology organization, went on to conduct a thorough investigation of the site. The group found flint tools, hide scrapers and arrowheads that dated back at least 5,000 years.

“It’s amazing how a family of rabbits have set in motion an incredible journey of discovery. Within the immediate vicinity of Land’s End, we were able to see a visible timeline of Britain, stretching deep into prehistory,” says Big Heritage’s Dean Paton. “Whilst the landscape will have changed considerably over time, it’s likely that the stunning natural beauty of the site would have always been significant to humans.”

Read more about the discovery at History.com.

February is Adopt a Rescued Rabbit Month!

Rabbit groomingIf you’ve done your homework and determined that you and your family are ready to welcome a rabbit into your home, then consider adoption!

Rabbit rescues and animal shelters are continually overrun with homeless rabbits. There are bunnies of all ages, shapes, and sizes just waiting for their forever homes. A shelter volunteer can help match you up with just the right bunny (or pair of bonded bunnies).

Plus, adopting a rabbit from a rescue or shelter doesn’t just benefit the bunny.  Many rescues litter train the rabbits in their care and acclimate them (if needed) to living inside the home.  Further, if the rabbits are mature enough, most rescues will have the rabbits neutered/spayed. This will save you money on vet bills for the procedure.

To find out more reasons to adopt a rabbit from a shelter as opposed to purchasing one from a breeder or pet store, see our article, “Benefits of Adopting a Pet Rabbit.”

If you’re ready to find a bunny in your area, you can start with PetFinder or you can check out the House Rabbit Society website for links to all of their regional chapters.

Small Pet Select Special Offer: Free Bunny Ring

Small Pet Select is offering a free bunny wrap ring with any purchase of hay or pellets! Just use the coupon code BUNNYRING at checkout. This adorable ring normally retails for $15.95.

Bunny Wrap Ring

To take advantage of the special, go to Small Pet Select and choose any size hay or pellets. At checkout, enter the coupon code BUNNYRING.  This coupon code will apply the Bunny Wrap Ring to your order, free of charge.  Once you proceed through checkout, Small Pet Select will send you a tracking number for your package.

To learn more about Small Pet Select, read our review of their timothy hay: Hay Day for Coco and Cosette.

Coco eating hay

Pet Rabbits Save Family from Fire

Rabbit

Pet rabbits save Tucson family.

Two pet rabbits alerted their owners to a kitchen fire one night in Tucson. Nicole Ochotorena, her husband, and their three children were all asleep when the fire broke out. The rabbits stomped their feet in their cage, waking the owners up. The smoke alarms did not go off.

“My bunnies are my lifesavers,” Ochotorena said. “They saved my life and they saved my kids.”

Learn more at myfoxchicago.com.