Bunny Blog

Category Archives: Bunny News

Greening Your Pet Care Book Review and Giveaway

In my article, 7 Ways Rabbits are Eco-Friendly Pets, I point out ways in which rabbits are innately eco-friendly, like their naturally vegan diet and their compostable poop. You can even ramp up your rabbit’s eco-friendliness by growing your own rabbit food and buying hay direct from a local farmer.

If these ideas appeal to you, you can delve further into the topic with a new book out now by journalist and animal advocate Darcy Matheson called Greening Your Pet Care: Reduce Your Animal’s Carbon Paw Print.

Early on in the book, Matheson provides a compelling argument about why we should consider and address our pets’ environmental impact:

The carbon footprint of our family pets is poised to grow exponentially in coming years. The number of household pets has more than doubled in the US since the 1970s, says the Humane Society, and tens of millions of North Americans now share their homes — and lives — with animals.

Covering ideas such as shopping locally, buying in bulk, and making your own household (and pet-safe) cleaners, Matheson starts off with eco-friendly actions that can be applied to any pet care situation. In subsequent chapters, she dives into specifics for dogs, cats, rabbits, small animals, mini pigs, birds, reptiles & amphibians, and fish. The rabbit chapter has expert advice from rabbit rescue founders, rabbit-savvy vets, and, if you take a gander at the gardening and composting sections, you might see a quote or two from yours truly.

Rabbit eating carrot top

Greening your pet care may seem like a difficult challenge at first. But Matheson breaks down the different steps in a very intuitive and encouraging manner. If you would like to learn more or purchase the book, see:

And now for some exciting news! Self-Counsel Press is giving away a copy of Greening Your Pet Care to one lucky My House Rabbit fan. Enter the contest using the Rafflecopter widget below:

a Rafflecopter giveaway

The contest ends on Sunday, May 22, 11:59pm EST and is open to residents of the continental United States and Canada only.  

We want to hear from you! What do you think about eco-friendly pet care? Is it something you would consider? Have you already taken steps to reduce your pet’s carbon paw print? Tell us in the comments below!

 

February is Adopt a Rescued Rabbit Month!

Rabbit valentineThis month is Adopt a Rescued Rabbit Month. And in case you weren’t aware, adopting a rabbit instead of buying one from a breeder or pet store has many benefits.

  • You can give a bunny a second chance. Through no fault of their own, some rabbits are surrendered to shelters or abandoned. When you adopt a rabbit (or pair of rabbits) from a shelter, you can ensure from that point on, that animal will lead a happy and healthy life.
  • You can find a good match. Volunteers at rabbit rescues come to know each one of their rabbits’ personalities. You can find a good match for you and your family (and your other rabbit if you’re looking to adopt a bond mate), when you adopt from a rescue.
  • You can walk away with a litter-trained bunny. Rabbits at rescues are often litter-trained by volunteers.
  • You save yourself money. Rescue rabbits are spayed/neutered at the appropriate age while at the shelter or in foster homes. Sometimes they are microchipped. So adopting from a rescue will save you money on costly veterinary expenses.

If you want to learn more, see our article, “Benefits of Adopting a Pet Rabbit.”

Speed Dating for the Lonely Rabbit

White rabbit and black and white rabbit

Potential roommate Tonya meets Moo for the first time. Photo by Yana Paskova, New York Times.

Moo is a two-year-old black and white bunny. His owners, Ashley Chui and Arthur Chow, thought he might be lonely while they were at work. So they enlisted the help of Amy Odum, a longtime volunteer of Animal Care Centers of NYC and a bunny matchmaker.

She places Moo in a small room and brings in a few potential roommates. He is met with a range of reactions: rebuffs, disinterest, mounting, and sniffing– everything a bunny owner should expect when introducing potential bond mates.

To read the full delightful account of Moo’s speed dating session, see the New York Times article, “Speed Dating Rabbits.”

You can also learn about the process of bonding bunnies in our article, Bonding Your Pet Bunnies.

If you’ve got a single bun, bunny speed dating might be something to consider. Your bunny may enjoy the companionship of another rabbit. With February being Adopt a Rescued Rabbit Month, why not schedule a speed dating session at your local rabbit rescue or shelter?

Celebrate International Rabbit Day on September 26, 2015

Rabbits

This year’s International Rabbit Day falls on Saturday, September 26. This special occasion occurs on the fourth Saturday and/or Sunday of every September and serves to celebrate rabbits and advocate for their well-being.

From pet rabbits, to wild rabbits, to laboratory rabbits, and meat rabbits, all of these animals deserve our attention. What actions will you take to improve the lives of these rabbits?

Here are some suggestions:

  • Make sure you are providing a safe, healthy, enriching indoor home for your pet rabbit. Take a look at our Rabbit Care and Rabbit Behavior sections for information about proper diet, indoor housing, bunny proofing, enrichment, and more. Our article, How to Care for a Pet Rabbit, provides a basic overview. Share the article with other rabbit owners!
  • Boycott and/or peacefully protest companies and organizations whose practices exploit rabbits (from product testing, to selling rabbit meat, to fur-farming, to conducting rabbit rodeos/scrambles, etc.).
  • Support cruelty-free companies.  Look for the Leaping Bunny logo on products. You can do a product search here.

For all bunny lovers, regardless of if you own a bunny or not, we will be posting an exclusive International Rabbit Day Gift Guide on September 26. The Gift Guide will list stores from the Etsy Rabbits Team, a group of Etsy shop owners who love and support rabbits and rabbit rescue. Each store will be offering special coupons and promos to celebrate the day!

IRD2015_giftguide

Check back on September 26 or follow us on Facebook or Twitter for updates.

Workout Bunnies: Rabbits Take Over Yoga Class in Vancouver

The Small Animal Rescue Society of B.C. is offering a different kind of yoga class this fall. Bunny yoga introduces adoptable rescue rabbits into the serene environment while class participants stretch and strengthen. The rabbits are supervised by SARS volunteers to ensure their safety. The event helps bring awareness about rabbits being suitable house pets for city dwellers. Learn more at Vancity Buzz and the SARS Facebook page.

Stretch it out, Coco!

Stretch it out, Coco!

For people who could use a little “cute” in their lives, the event sounds like it would hit the spot. I can say from personal experience working out with house rabbits, it certainly adds excitement to the mix. Coco and Cosette enjoy being active participants in my workout, engaging in the following activities:

  • Chewing the corner of my mat while I’m in the middle of a set
  • Sitting under me when I’m doing push-ups or holding a plank position
  • Digging on my back while I’m trying to stretch
  • Trying to eat the pedal strap as I’m pedaling my stationary bike
Rabbit in between weights.

“Oh, you’re trying to work out? I’ll stand here.”

 

International Rabbit Day 2014

It’s International Rabbit Day!  This weekend is dedicated to promoting the well-being of rabbits everywhere- from pet rabbits, to wild rabbits, to lab rabbits, and more.

Rabbit under table

How can we as rabbit lovers make a difference in a rabbit’s life?  Here are a few ways:

  • Make sure you are providing a safe, healthy, enriching indoor home for your pet rabbit. Take a look at our Rabbit Care and Rabbit Behavior sections for information about proper diet, indoor housing, bunny proofing, enrichment, and more. Our article, How to Care for a Pet Rabbit, provides a basic overview. Share the article with other rabbit owners!
  • Boycott and/or peacefully protest companies and organizations whose practices exploit rabbits (from product testing, to selling rabbit meat, to fur-farming, to conducting rabbit rodeos/scrambles, etc.).
  • Support cruelty-free companies.  Look for the Leaping Bunny logo on products. You can do a product search here.

What will you do to celebrate International Rabbit Day?

Combat Infantry Bunny Update

In 2009, we were introduced to a story about Carolyn Schapper, an Army sergeant who took a rabbit into her care. (See the post here) She recently update her story on 0-Dark-Thirty, the literary magazine of the Veterans Writing Project. You can read the conclusion to her time with her rabbit, CIB, here, but a word of warning for our bunny-lovers, it doesn’t end well.

Bunnies by the Beach: San Diego House Rabbit Society’s New Shelter

The San Diego House Rabbit Society recently opened a brand new shelter for their adoptable bunnies! See their new facility near the beach in this video:

San Diego, California News Station – KFMB Channel 8 – cbs8.com

The San Diego House Rabbit Society is a volunteer-driven, nonprofit rabbit welfare organization that works with local shelters and humane societies to care for and find homes for abandoned domestic rabbits. All rabbits are spayed or neutered, litter box trained, and adopted to homes where they live as indoor family companions.

Learn more at their website >

Amy Sedaris and Bunnies in Style Magazine

Amy Sedaris

Amy Sedaris with her rabbit Dusty.

Comedian, actress, and house rabbit advocate Amy Sedaris recently gave an interview in Style Magazine. She spoke about her rabbit Dusty, who recently passed away at 12 years old, Tattletale, her first rabbit, as well as general tidbits about living with house rabbits. Here are some highlights.

Regarding her friend, Stephen Colbert:

“Stephen wasn’t crazy about getting a rabbit. His kids wanted one and he didn’t want the responsibility, but he got a little black bunny, who actually just had its leg amputated. And I went over to his house and was like, ‘Stephen! You’re doing everything wrong!’ and I sent him hay and books and information. Now the rabbit is doing really well!”

On pampering her bunnies:

“One time on Strangers, we did an Indians episode. I brought the tepee back to my apartment, and Tattletale lived in that for a while.”

On rabbit behavior:

“Give them any kind of cardboard to chew on. They love it. They chew everything. My rabbits chewed my shoes and the side of my bed. They shredded my bed skirts. All of my clothes still have holes. If you really love your rabbit, you won’t care.”

Read the full article at Style.com.

House Rabbit Society Offers Aid to Rabbits Found in Landfill

Rescued rabbitsThe latest Emergency Rescue Grant from the House Rabbit Society was awarded to Napa Humane Society and the student chapter of the UC Davis Humane Society Veterinary Medical Association to help pay for spays and neuters of 27 rabbits rescued from a field near the Fairfield landfill in Solano County, California.

If you would like to help rescue efforts like these, you can donate to the House Rabbit Society towards their Emergency Rescue Grant program. Learn more >

Rabbits Unearth Rare Artifacts

One bunny archaeologist at Land's End. Photo by: David Chapman Photography for Land's End Landmark.

One bunny archaeologist at Land’s End. Photo by: David Chapman Photography for Land’s End Landmark.

While constructing their intricate warrens, wild rabbits living on Land’s End, the westernmost point in England, recently unearthed some rare ancient treasures.

Big Heritage, a nonprofit archaeology organization, went on to conduct a thorough investigation of the site. The group found flint tools, hide scrapers and arrowheads that dated back at least 5,000 years.

“It’s amazing how a family of rabbits have set in motion an incredible journey of discovery. Within the immediate vicinity of Land’s End, we were able to see a visible timeline of Britain, stretching deep into prehistory,” says Big Heritage’s Dean Paton. “Whilst the landscape will have changed considerably over time, it’s likely that the stunning natural beauty of the site would have always been significant to humans.”

Read more about the discovery at History.com.

February is Adopt a Rescued Rabbit Month!

Rabbit groomingIf you’ve done your homework and determined that you and your family are ready to welcome a rabbit into your home, then consider adoption!

Rabbit rescues and animal shelters are continually overrun with homeless rabbits. There are bunnies of all ages, shapes, and sizes just waiting for their forever homes. A shelter volunteer can help match you up with just the right bunny (or pair of bonded bunnies).

Plus, adopting a rabbit from a rescue or shelter doesn’t just benefit the bunny.  Many rescues litter train the rabbits in their care and acclimate them (if needed) to living inside the home.  Further, if the rabbits are mature enough, most rescues will have the rabbits neutered/spayed. This will save you money on vet bills for the procedure.

To find out more reasons to adopt a rabbit from a shelter as opposed to purchasing one from a breeder or pet store, see our article, “Benefits of Adopting a Pet Rabbit.”

If you’re ready to find a bunny in your area, you can start with PetFinder or you can check out the House Rabbit Society website for links to all of their regional chapters.

Small Pet Select Special Offer: Free Bunny Ring

Small Pet Select is offering a free bunny wrap ring with any purchase of hay or pellets! Just use the coupon code BUNNYRING at checkout. This adorable ring normally retails for $15.95.

Bunny Wrap Ring

To take advantage of the special, go to Small Pet Select and choose any size hay or pellets. At checkout, enter the coupon code BUNNYRING.  This coupon code will apply the Bunny Wrap Ring to your order, free of charge.  Once you proceed through checkout, Small Pet Select will send you a tracking number for your package.

To learn more about Small Pet Select, read our review of their timothy hay: Hay Day for Coco and Cosette.

Coco eating hay