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Category Archives: Bunny News

Canmore Bunnies

Canmore bunnies

Canmore, Alberta has been home to an overabundance of feral rabbits for nearly 30 years. Recently the town council contracted Animal Damage Control to cull the rabbits starting November 14.

The feral population exploded after pet owners released their domestic rabbits into the wild. Although domestic rabbits usually do not survive on their own, these did. And the rabbits produced more and more offspring until the population reached its current estimated total of 800 rabbits.

These feral rabbits damage property and attract wild predators into neighborhoods and therefore must be removed from the town. However, local rescue group Save Canmore Bunnies, headed by Kyndra Biggy, would like to impose a different solution than a cull. Their plan is to round up the rabbits, spay/neuter them, and then relocate them to bunny-friendly sanctuaries. But this costs money. The group needs to raise $100,000 in order to put their plan into action. If you would like to donate money, veterinary services, or sanctuary land, visit the Save Canmore Bunnies Want to Help page.

Save Canmore Bunnies has estimated it will cost $130 per rabbit.

To learn more, see:
CTV Edmonton
Save Canmore Bunnies

House Rabbit Society Thanksgiving Challenge 2011

Bunny with pumpkinIt’s that time of year!  From now until November 24, your donations to the House Rabbit Society Thanksgiving Fund will be matched by a generous donor.

This year, the Thanksgiving Fund will go towards opening a low-cost spay/neuter clinic in northern California. The money raised will pay for a part-time veterinarian, a part-time vet tech, and some medical supplies.

So this is a great opportunity to help rabbits and rabbit owners! Make a donation at the House Rabbit Society website.

New York House Rabbit Conference

March hareRabbit lovers in the northeast US: You may be interested in attending the annual House Rabbit Society / Rabbit Rescue & Rehab Conference on Sunday, October 23 from 10am – 5pm at the Radisson Hotel in New Rochelle, New York.

The rabbit care conference will cover topics such as rabbit behavior and training, bunny bonding, medical Q&As, demonstrations, goodies, and more! You may even run into actress/comedienne and longtime rabbit advocate Amy Sedaris!

For more information, see the Rabbit Rescue & Rehab website.

Wild Rabbits in Trouble

Pygmy rabbit

Pygmy rabbit (Photo by Washington State University)

Both the pygmy rabbit and the New England cottontail have been in the news recently for diminishing populations in the wild.

Earlier this week, Western Watersheds Project of Hailey, Idaho filed a court challenge to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s denial of endangered species protection to pygmy rabbits.  Pygmy rabbits, which are tiny enough to fit into the palm of your hand, have experienced a decrease in population as a result of habitat fragmentation and loss, which was caused by livestock grazing.

A survey conducted by scientists at the University of Rhode Island and the state Department of Environmental Management revealed virtually no sign of the native New England cottontail rabbit in Rhode Island.  Last winter, rabbit droppings were collected and DNA tested.  The results showed that all the droppings belonged to non-native Eastern cottontails.  Eastern cottontails were introduced to the area in the 1930s and have flourished while New England cottontail populations declined. Although attempts have been made to introduce new habitat (young forests, scrub brush), the New England cottontail is close to being placed on the Endangered Species List.

For more info, see:

Pygmy Rabbit: Western Watersheds Project Press Release
New England Cottontail: Providence  Journal

Educational Rabbit Toy Nominated for Design Award

Rabbit Ray

Rabbit Ray looks like a cute white rabbit toy on the surface.  But student designer Esther Wang Chunshu of Singapore has created much more than just a toy; she has designed a useful tool for hospital staff to communicate with child patients.

Rabbit Ray has several functions. On the outside, the cute rabbit face comforts kids.  In fact, its aesthetic was the most popular choice in a survey of 50 children.  Further, because it is structured similar to a human body, kids can point to areas on the bunny that correspond to where it hurts on their own bodies.

The bunny toy opens up to show a diagram of organs in the body.  This is useful for explaining common illnesses to children.  The other side houses tools for common procedures like drawing blood.  Medical practitioners can use these instruments on the toy rabbit to demonstrate the procedure to the children so they will understand and become more comfortable with the process.

The invention has been nominated for the James Dyson Award, which is an international student design award.  The focus is for students to “design something that solves a problem.”

To learn more, see Rabbit Ray’s entry on the James Dyson Award website.

UPDATE 11/1/12: If you have questions or would like to buy Rabbit Ray, you can email Esther Wang Chunshu at estherspeaks [at] joytingle.com.

Baskets for Bunnies

Baskets for BunniesBaskets for Bunnies is a new nonprofit organization that assists rabbit rescues with supplies and funds. Founded by Gretta Parker, the organization hopes to take some of the fundraising burden off shelters, so they can focus their attention on rescuing more bunnies.

This year, they have chosen seven rescues to aid:

In the future, Parker plans to expand Baskets for Bunnies to include a spay/neuter program and to support rescues internationally.

If you are interested in learning more about Baskets for Bunnies, the rescues they support, or donating, please visit them at their website or  find them on Facebook.

 

Post-Irene at My House Rabbit

Fallen tree from Hurricane Irene

Fallen tree from Hurricane Irene

Here in coastal Connecticut, Hurricane Irene wreaked a fair amount of havoc, damaging trees and property, causing flooding, and leaving hundreds of thousands of people without power (including us).

Slanted apple tree after Hurricane Irene

We found our apple trees at 45 degree angles.

Gardens after Hurricane Irene

We had staked everything down on our raised beds and moved most of our potted plants to the basement.

But through all that, Coco and Cosette were happily oblivious to the storm.  (Apparently bunnies aren’t that bothered when they don’t have lights or internet access.)  Their veggies stayed cold enough in the fridge and there were still cardboard castles to renovate.

Rabbits grooming

Here they are today, two days after the storm, still happily oblivious.

Rabbit grooming

Yesterday, while we were still without power, we spent a very pleasant, sunny day cleaning up the yard and gardens. It was the perfect opportunity to plant some fall crops as well! We planted bok choy, romaine lettuce, and spinach.

Tree staked after Hurricane Irene

We staked our apple trees so they are now growing upright again.

Garden cleaned up after Hurricane Irene

We cleaned up our gardens, brought the potted plants back out, and planted new fall crops.

For those of you also affected by the hurricane, how are you and your bunnies faring now?

Special Needs Bunny Receives Prosthetic Device

Rabbit with prosthetic bucket

Haviva Lush, founder of Rabbit Rescue, Inc. and daughter Anika help Pipkin with his new prosthetic bucket. Photo by Graham Paine/Canadian Champion.

Special needs bunny Pipkin was taken in by Haviva Lush,  founder of the Canadian charity Rabbit Rescue, five years ago.  Pipkin was born with several issues: his front legs were splayed, he was missing a hip joint, and one hind leg was shorter than the other (and was later amputated).

Yet despite all this, Pipkin’s temperament remained surprisingly happy.  So when the opportunity arose to be fitted with a prosthetic bucket to help stabilize him and keep him upright, Pipkin was a great candidate.

The device was created by Dr. Joyce Olynich, a Toronto-based vet who specializes in prostheses. It was the first prosthetic bucket made for a rabbit in Canada.

To learn more about Pipkin’s story, see InsideHalton.

Bob Barker Advocates Being a Caring Consumer


(Note: The video contains images of animal testing.)

Watch the Public Service Announcement above featuring Bob Barker and his bunny pal Benny, which discusses the importance of using personal care and household products that are not tested on animals.

To view a list of cruelty-free companies (and a list of companies that DO test on animals that you should avoid), see PETA’s searchable database of companies.

Lab Animals in the UK Need Your Help

The British government is considering replacing current lab animal regulations with a new EU directive that offers less protection.  Adopting the EU law could result in reduced inspections in labs, less oversight by ethical committees, inhumane methods of killing,  and an increase in suffering by lab animals in the UK.

Every year approximately 10,138 rabbits are used in experiments in the UK.  These animals need your help.  If 10,000 people raise their voices by September 5th and urge the British government to say no to the EU law,  this could prevent a huge step back in animal welfare in the UK.  If you live in the UK, you can say no to the consultation by clicking here.

To learn more about the campaign, visit Give Animals a Voice.

Cleveland Art Rabbits

Garden Party rabbit art by Laurie Musser

"Garden Party" by Laurie Musser. Sponsored by Key Bank. Photo by Tony Barchock.

In honor of the Chinese Year of the Rabbit, the St Clair Superior Development Corporation put together a public art campaign in the city of Cleveland, OH. Local artists decorated 25 fiberglass rabbit sculptures which were installed in key locations throughout the city.

For more information and photos of these stunning works of art, see:

Mass Rabbit Rescue in Ontario

Rabbits from Manitoulin Island mass rescue

Three rabbits from the Manitoulin Island mass rescue. Photo: Henry Stancu/Toronto Star

Over 200 rabbits were rescued from a home on Manitoulin Island, an island in Lake Huron in the province of Ontario. The Ontario SPCA, Rabbit Rescue, and other animal organizations rushed in to provide medical attention and find new homes for the bunnies.

The mass rescue is an enormous undertaking, and there are several ways you can help these organizations help the rabbits:

  • Donate financially  – Costs from medical attention, food, housing, and other supplies quickly add up.

If you live in Ontario,

  • Volunteer to foster- Finding temporary homes for this many rabbits can be challenging.
  • Donate supplies – Donations of carriers, x-pens, neat idea cubes, food and other supplies are appreciated.
  • Adopt – Consider adoption if you can provide a forever home for any of these rabbits.

To learn more, see:

 

Japanese Earless Bunny

An earless bunny in Japan is sparking up debate about whether we are seeing signs of mutation as a result of the Fukushima nuclear site’s meltdown back in March. I wasn’t going to post since I felt like the sample size of one rabbit wasn’t sufficient to back up these claims, especially since we’ve posted in the past about another earless rabbit named Vincent Van Gogh.

But the video of the white bunny was cute, so here it is:

For more information, see:
AOL Weird News
MSNBC’s Cosmic Log

It’s Rabbit Awareness Week!

Rabbit Awareness Week logoFor all the bunny lovers in the UK, this week is a wonderful time to learn more about proper rabbit care and get free health checkups.

It’s Rabbit Awareness Week (RAW) from May 23 – May 29, 2011!

Here are a few facts about pet bunnies:

  • Rabbits can be litterbox trained.
  • Rabbits need space to run and play everyday. In fact, many rabbit owners opt to let their bunnies have free reign all the time in a bunny-proofed room or entire home. They don’t actually need to be caged.
  • Rabbits’ main diet should be hay (not pellets!). Hay should be available to rabbits at all times so they can graze when they want.
  • Most rabbits don’t like being held. They prefer that you sit down with them at their level.
  • Spaying/neutering your rabbit is essential. When spayed/neutered, rabbits become less aggressive and territorial, males stop spraying, litterbox habits improve, there are no accidental babies, and cancer risk decreases significantly.

Watch an adorable video from the RSPCA of how rabbits act when they’re not stuck in a hutch all day:

To find out which places are offering free health checkups and other rabbit-related events, go to the event locator on the Rabbit Awareness Week website.

To learn more about rabbit care, see: